The Still and Moving Image

the still and moving image fig strip

 

Academic Team:
Dawn Marlan (damarlan@uoregon.edu
First-Year Experience Seminar Instructor
Jade Sun (jasu@uoregon.edu)
FIG Assistant

9 credits

The Still and Moving Image 1 Schedule: 

UGST 109 First Year Experience Seminar – 1 Credit 

CRN: 16285: T: 4:00 – 5:20 PM, LIL 132 

COLT 103 Introduction to Comparative Literature: Visual Culture – 4 credits 

CRN: 16117: TR: 12:00 – 1:20 PM, CHA 220, +DIS CRN: F: 16567: 9:00 – 9:50 AM, MCK 473 

CINE 265 History of Motion Picture I: The Silent Era – 4 credits 

CRN: 16043: M: 2:00 – 2:50 PM, STB 156 , CRN: 16043: W: 2:00 – 4:50 PM, STB 156, +DIS CRN: 16044: F: 8:00 – 8:50 AM, MCK 214 

The Still and Moving Image 2 Schedule: 

UGST 109 First Year Experience Seminar – 1 Credit 

CRN: 16285: T: 4:00 – 5:20 PM, LIL 132 

COLT 103 Introduction to Comparative Literature: Visual Culture – 4 credits 

CRN: 16117: TR: 12:00 – 1:20 PM, CHA 220, +DIS CRN: 16563: R: 12:00 – 12:50 PM, MCK 473 

CINE 265 History of Motion Picture I: The Silent Era – 4 credits 

CRN: 16043: M: 2:00 – 2:50 PM, STB 156, CRN: 16043: W: 2:00 – 4:50 PM, STB 156, +DIS CRN: 16044: F: 8:00 – 8:50 AM, MCK 214 

The Still and Moving Image 3 Schedule: 

UGST 109 First Year Experience Seminar – 1 Credit 

CRN: 16285: T: 4:00 – 5:20 PM, LIL 132 

COLT 103 Introduction to Comparative Literature: Visual Culture – 4 credits 

CRN: 16117: TR: 12:00 – 1:20 PM, CHA 220, +DIS CRN: R: 16563: 12:00 – 12:50 PM, MCK 473 

CINE 265 History of Motion Picture I: The Silent Era – 4 credits 

CRN: 16043: M: 2:00 – 2:50 PM, STB 156, CRN: 16043: W: 2:00 – 4:50 PM, STB 156, +DIS CRN: 16044: F: 8:00 – 8:50 AM, MCK 21

 
About the FIG:

Through psychoanalytic theory and discussions of the gendered gaze, we will explore how visual culture affects us, emotionally, aesthetically, and politically. Focusing thematically on dream-like images that create deliberate confusion about what is real and what is imagined, we will be asking—How might such confusion be purposeful? How might dream images help us to evade censorship, confront a history that haunts us, and imagine a future that’s difficult to fathom?   

This FIG is for students interested both in the aesthetics of film and photography and in historical and theoretical approaches to it. While CINE 265 has a historical perspective centered on the evolution of cinema as an art form, COLT 103 introduces students to theoretical approaches to viewing images and film, including exploring visual pleasure and displeasure.  

CINE 265 History of Motion Picture I: The Silent Era - CoreEd or major satisfying course

CINE 265 is the first in a three-part chronological survey of the evolution of cinema as an institution and an art form. CINE 265 moves from the origins of cinema in the late 19th century through World War II. The primary texts for the course are the films themselves, but supplementary readings will also be assigned. The aim of the course is to develop interpretive skills relevant to the study of film by examining the history of major movements in Hollywood and world cinema. As a broad introduction to interpretive, theoretical, and institutional issues that are central to the study of film, CINE 265 satisfies the university's Group Requirement in the Arts and Letters category. The courses in motion picture history, CINE 265, 266, and 267 may be taken individually or as parts of an integrated series.

COLT 103 Intro to Comparative Lit: Visual Culture - CoreEd or major satisfying course

The "Introduction to Comparative Literature" series (COLT 101, 102, 103) introduces students to the study of world culture. Each course emphasizes the richness and complexity of world culture, covering a broad array of works from classical Greece to the modern Caribbean, from Shakespeare to the Kenyan essayist and playwright Ngugi wa Thiong'o. However, where COLT 101 and 102 focus primarily on written texts, COLT 103 introduces students to the study of Comparative Literature by considering visual culture from across the world. "Visual culture" is a term that has been used within the discipline for several decades now, and includes topics in world film and digital media; performance and live culture; and, finally, texts that combine word and image (e.g. graphic novels and photojournalism). In many ways the study of visual culture now represents the cutting edge of Comparative Literature as a discipline. COLT 101, 102 and 103 complement each other, and may be taken individually or out of sequence. COLT 103 satisfies both the University's Arts and Letters requirement and the International Cultures multicultural requirement.

Meet your FIG Assistant and Instructor!