Planning for the Planet

planning for the planet

 

Academic Team:
Rebecca Lewis (rlewis9@uoregon.edu
First-Year Experience Seminar Instructor
Sam Plager (plager@uoregon.edu)
FIG Assistant

9 credits
UGST 109 First Year Experience Seminar – 1 credit 
CRN: 16274: W: 3:00pm-3:50pm, STB 254 
PPPM 205 Intro to City Planning – 4 credits 
CRN: 14535: MW: 12:00pm-1:20pm, LIL 282, +DIS CRN: 14537: F: 9:00am-9:50am, STB 151 ENVS 203 
Intro to Environmental Studies: Humanities – 4 credits 
CRN: 11967: TR: 12:00pm-1:20pm, PAC 123, +DIS  CRN: 11971: F: 11:00-11:50am, COL 142 

 
 
About the FIG:

How does the way our cities are built relate to climate change?  What can cities and residents do to promote sustainable land use and transportation?  This FIG uses Eugene as a laboratory to examine how city design and transportation affects climate change and what to do about it. Consider the politics and equity implications of shifting to greener ways to travel.      

We will explore the city by bicycle, bus, and foot through fun activities and field trips throughout the term. We’ll examine recent investments in bus rapid transit and bicycle infrastructure in the city of Eugene to connect it to the concepts discussed in the lecture courses.  

PPPM 205 Introduction to City Planning - CoreEd or major satisfying course

This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. (The course must be taken for a grade in order to satisfy ENVS/ESCI major requirements.)

ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities - CoreEd or major satisfying course

This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. (The course must be taken for a grade in order to satisfy ENVS/ESCI major requirements.)

Meet your FIG Assistant and Instructor!