Development Safari

development safari

What is Development and does everyone want the same development? Who gets to decide what development looks like? This FIG exposes students to the Swahili worldview & way of life (East Africa) in the First Year Swahili Class and then pushes them to interrogate dominant global models of International development that they glean in their FLR 225 class.


Students explore the intersection of topics by taking the following course package*:

*Courses in the FIG package may be subject to change

SWAH 199 College Connections - FIG Seminar, 1-credit

SWAH 101 First Year Swahili - CoreEd or major satisfying course, 5-credits

Introduction to Swahili, stressing speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension skills. At the UO, Swahili satisfies the Foreign language requirements and also the African Studies Minor requirements. Swahili is the major language of East Africa (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania) including parts of Mozambique, Zambia, DRC, Burundi, Rwanda, Somalia, Mauritius and the Comoros. It is also spoken in the East African diaspora – wherever East Africans are domiciled away from the region. Spoken by over 120 million people, Swahili is increasingly becoming a major world language.

FLR 225 Voices of Africa - CoreEd or major satisfying course, 4-credits

This course introduces students to the diversity and vivacity of life in African contexts through engagement with a variety of voices from across the continent. Many courses about Africa at UO tend toemphasize critical issues impacting African peoples, contributing to many students knowing little about life in Africa other than that there are social problems. The focus of this course is different in its emphasis on the daily lives and expressivity and creativity of people living in a wide variety of social,cultural, economic, and political contexts on the continent.


FIG Theme:

Path to Global Citizenship

Flight Path Theme:

Media Arts and ExpressionGlobal Connections

 

 

 

Learn more about Professor Mokaya Bosire through his Faculty Persepectives Session on Engaged Humanities.