Bella Italia!

Bella Italia text overlaying food and a coliseum

 

Academic Team:
Harinder Kaur Khalsa (harinder@uoregon.edu
First-Year Experience Seminar Instructor
Blue Jones (ebjo@uoregon.edu)
FIG Assistant

10 credits
UGST 109 First-Year Experience Seminar - 1 credit
 
ITAL 101 First Year Italian - 5 credits
 
GLBL 101 Introduction to International Issues- 4 credits

 
 
About the FIG:

In this FIG comprised of GLBL 101 and ITAL 101, you will explore new perspectives that will help you become a global citizen. In GLBL 101, you will identify various issues that face the peoples of the World, how they mitigate those issues, and how the members of a global community might work together to address them. In ITAL 101, you will learn how to communicate in a new language and culture. We hope that this FIG will strengthen your ability to look at different aspects of culture, language, society, and politics through a creative and critical lens. You will explore how these factors shape our identities and outline privileges and challenges people may face to help us inform the decisions we make as contributing members of society on a local and global scale. In the UGST component of this FIG you will create a strong community of learners, reflect on your growth as a learner, and have fun cooking a simple Italian meal, interacting with other Italian and Global Studies professors and students.

ITAL 101 First Year Italian - CoreEd or major satisfying course

Introduction to Italian stressing speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension skills. Sequence

GLBL 101 Introduction to International Issues - CoreEd or major satisfying course


Hunger, intellectual property, global warming, arms trade, water rights, resource depletion, civil war, genocide, biodiversity loss, terrorism, education, global financial inequities, and immigration: These a just a few examples of the sometimes overwhelming list of challenges we face in a highly globalized world. Some are new but most have been with us for thousands of years. What have changed significantly and rapidly are our mobility and our access to information and images. Issues which a few decades ago may have seemed distant and disconnected are now thrust upon us or at least accessible through various media. Among the wide range of problems and issues faced by people throughout the world, who decides which issues get priority and attention? What informs your own sense of compassion and focus? Does our heightened sense of connection move us more quickly to resolution or to greater cynicism?

The course is designed to meet the social science group-satisfying general education requirement. As the syllabus demonstrates, GLBL 101 covers a cross-section of issues, perspectives and scholarly modes of analysis by those working in the field of international studies. The course subject matter is broad, covering issues such as hunger, intellectual property, global warming, arms trade, water rights, resource depletion, civil war, genocide, biodiversity loss, terrorism, education, global financial inequities, and immigration. The course is grounded in the social sciences with readings and lecture material largely informed by the fields of human geography, sociology, political science, and social psychology. The course compels students to consider ways in which current international issues are framed by popular media, various stakeholders, and academicians (from the social sciences)